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    Canola Seeds

    Canola is a plant that is a member of a large family of plants called crucifers. Crucifers are easy to identify because the four yellow flower petals form the shape of a cross. The canola plants grow to a height of one to two metres. The yellow flower produces seed pods that are about 5 centimetres in length. There is an average of 60 to 100 pods per plant. Each seed pod contains 20 to 30 tiny, round seeds which are 1 mm. in diameter. When it is ready to harvest, the plant changes colour from green to light yellow. These tiny seeds are crushed to extrude canola oil.

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    Cotton Seeds

    Cotton is grown on every habitable continent, providing clothing, home goods and food to the world. The crop grows mainly in areas that have subtropical climates.

    The part of the cotton plant that most people are familiar with is the fiber, or lint. The lint is used to make cloth—for towels, clothes, sheets, etc. The cottonseeds from the plant are crushed into cottonseed oil, which can be used in everyday items such as cooking oil and salad dressing, and into hulls and meal, which are used for livestock feed.

    Various types of cotton are grown all over the world. In the United States, upland cotton, which is indigenous to the Western Hemisphere, is the predominant type. Pima, or extra-long staple, cotton is grown as well, and it is considered higher-value cotton.

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    Linola Seeds

    Linola is a new form of Linseed which produces high quality polyunsaturated edible oil. Produced through conventional plant breeding, it has very low levels of linolenic acid. The seed is light yellow. Linola Oil is well suited for uses such as margarines, salad oils and dressings. Linola seed, ground or whole, can be used in the same applications as linseed meal, primarily as a ruminant feed.

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    Mustard Seeds

    Mustard is one of the most popular condiments widely available today, but have you ever wondered where it comes from? The answer lies in a tiny 1- to 3-millimeter round seed.

    Because it’s the main ingredient used to make mustard, the humble mustard seed now ranks as the second most-used spice in the U.S., after peppercorns.

    Despite their small size, they have been found to possess a number of benefits for your overall health. Keep reading to discover more interesting facts about mustard seeds.

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    Peanuts Seeds

    Peanut seeds are planted one to two inches deep, one every six inches or so apart, in rows about three feet apart. The seeds do best in sandy soil, especially soil rich in calcium. When the soil temperature is warm (65-70 F.) given enough water the seeds will sprout. In about two weeks, the first “square” of four leaflets will unfold above the peanut field. Thirty to forty days after emergence the plants bloom, “pegs” form and enter the soil. The peanut shells and kernels develop and mature during the next 60 to 70 day period. Depending on the variety, 120 to 160 frost free days are required for a good crop.

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    Rape Seeds

    Oilseed rape (or canola) is an important oil-bearing crop. The rapeseed/canola oil is employed in food industry as well as in technology, such as in bio-diesel production (as a fatty acid methyl ester). The importance of rapeseed cakes in feed industry and for energy purposes is also considerable. The technology for rapeseed oil pressing at Farmet stems from extensive practical experience with this plant. The process of rapeseed pressing is designed to take into account the desired properties of the resulting oil (particularly the phosphorus content) and the content of nutritional and anti-nutritional substances in the cakes (e.g., glucosinolates, by-pass protein).

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    Safflower Seeds

    Safflower Oil is, as the name implies, an oil made from the extract of the safflower seeds. Safflowers; both as a plant and after being pressed into an oil have had a rich history in civilizations in both the east and the west and it’s still very much viable in today’s economy and diet. Safflower oil is one item that bridges the commercialization of agriculture from ancient times to modern day. There are a number of benefits to using safflower oil as a health and nutritional supplement, but it also has a variety of commercial purposes as well.

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    Sesame Seeds

    One of the first oil seeds known to humankind, sesame seeds have been widely employed in culinary as well as in traditional medicines for their nutritive, preventive, and curative properties. Sesame is a primary source of phytonutrients such as omega-6 fatty acids, flavonoid phenolic anti-oxidants, vitamins, and dietary fiber with potential anti-cancer as well as health promoting properties.

    Sesame plant is a tall annual herb in the Pedaliaceae family, which grows extensively in Asia, particularly in Burma, China, and India. It is also one of the chief commercial crops in Nigeria, Sudan, and Ethiopia. Scientific name: Sesamum indicum.

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    Soybeans Seeds

    Soybeans can be harvested in the snap/green stage or the dry stage. When soybeans are young and green, they are ready for harvest when the seeds have formed but the pods are still tender. Dry soybeans are ready for harvest when the pods are dry and brittle and the seeds inside are hard.

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    Sunflower Seeds

    Perhaps most well-known as the salty snack of choice found in nearly every baseball player’s pocket, the benefits of sunflower seeds extend way beyond their irresistible flavor and satisfyingly crunchy texture. In fact, sunflower seeds are jam-packed with a wealth of important nutrients and have been associated with a multitude of health benefits, ranging from enhanced skin health to protection against bone loss.

    So whether you’re chowing down on the seeds as a snack, adding them to salads or dishes, or making sunflower seed butter out of your seeds, there’s no shortage of ways to consume sunflower seeds and take advantage of their benefits.

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